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ADVICE / NUTRITION / THANKSGIVING FEAST : WHAT YOU CAN AND CAN'T SHARE WITH YOUR PUPS
Thanksgiving Feast : What you Can and Can't Share with your Pups
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Thanksgiving is a time for food, family, and gratitude. But to your pet, it means one thing - table scraps! We know it’s hard not to let your pets in on the feast, but follow these guidelines to avoid holiday hazards.

First, if you have guests joining you, set some ground rules. Request for your guests do not feed your pet. It may save you some awkward finger-pointing later when Fluffy gets an upset tummy in grandma’s shoes.

Second, avoid giving the following to your dog, some of which could end in a trip to the Emergency Vet:
High fat foods - Foods that are high in fat, especially if it is not part of their regular diet,
can lead to diarrhea, vomiting or even pancreatitis. Avoid turkey skin, fried food, fats from meat, biscuits, gratings (heavy cream, butter and cheese used to make gratins that are loaded with saturated fat), stuffing with sausage, avocado, etc.
Onion, Garlic - This food are toxic for you pup and can cause severe anemia.
Chocolate– It can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, tremors and seizures.
Grapes, Raisins – These are considered toxic and can cause kidney failure.
Xylitol - This sweetener shows up in candy, as well as some brands of peanut butter, sugar-free products, jellies and jams, baked goods and breath mints.
Alcohol or Caffeine - Not even in moderation, when it comes to Fido.
Macadamia nuts – It is also considered toxic, leading to serious problems.
Bones – They may cause your pet to choke and can also form sharp ends when the animal bites, possibly causing obstruction and wounds in the gastrointestinal tract.
Milk and dairy products – These can cause diarrhea and other digestive problems for your dog.
Seasoning, spices, salt and sugar (this includes all the deserts)- They can lead to upset stomach and other complications. Try to avoid them. 
Gravy - You can make your pet his own gravy, taking the liquid in caned food and pouring it over your dog's kibble.
 
If your family can’t resist giving your pup a seat at the table, some Thanksgiving foods can be shared. However, remember - all ingredients in moderation, especially if your puppy is not used to this kind of food!
 
Turkey breast – Try to choose the parts without seasoning like the middle of the meat.  Avoid the skin.
Carrots - It is a very healthy snack. It contains vitamins, minerals, fibers, antioxidants and it has low calories.  
Sweet Potatoes/Pumpkins – It is a rich source of fiber, vitamins and minerals.
Rice – Cooked plain white rice is very safe for dogs.
Apples or watermelon (without seeds or rinds)– You can always give some of these fruits in moderation. 








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